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Hello, I’m Chris Nyffeler

Design Director, IDEO San Francisco

I provide creative guidance and hands-on design to teams that are making digital technology useful, usable, and enjoyable to use. 

What you won’t learn from my bio:
I’ve been IDEO’s Fantasy Football commissioner since 2005. Even with all that experience, I still only have one league championship to date.

Joined IDEO: 
2005

My Work

Full Bio

Chris Nyffeler was all about print as a kid — in fact, he apprenticed at a print shop. But after building his first website in 1995, he never turned back. Today, his preferred medium is anywhere people and technology intersect. His goal: to create unobtrusive digital products that integrate with and improve daily life.

As a Design Director at IDEO, focusing on Interaction Design, Chris takes a lead role in providing guidance to a community of visual, systems, and user experience designers, as well as software developers. He plays an active role in shaping IDEO’s portfolio of digital work and pushing the craft of interaction design both inside and outside the company.

Chris provides program leadership in high-growth industries, such as consumer web, mobile, e-commerce, digital health, and social media. He has elevated design thinking for major tech corporations and government agencies, and has helped to launch successful, design-centric tech startups in San Francisco and Silicon Valley.

Chris has been awarded a number of patents in the U.S. and Japan for mobile interface and interaction design. His work has been recognized by The Webby Awards, IDEA Awards, IXDA Interaction Awards, WIRED, Fast Company, Metropolis Magazine and major online tech blogs. As a faculty member in the undergraduate program in Interaction Design at the California College of the Arts, Chris is constantly reinforcing his philosophy of unobtrusive technology.

When he clocks out at the end of the day, Chris packs away the screens to focus on other things he loves: building elaborate wooden train sets with his son, home-brewing beer, teaching his son to use the telescope to see the natural beauty in the world around him, and creating sometimes complicated solutions on how to get technology out of his own life.